Chairpersons – CV

Andrew MarksCV

 
 

Andrew MARKS

  Institution :
The Clyde and Helen Wu Center for Molecular Cardiology, Columbia – University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY 10032
  Institute :
Department of Physiology and Cellular Biophysics
  Position : Research Director
  Contact : arm42@columbia.edu

Andrew R. Marks, MD, was born February 22, 1955 in New York City. He received his undergraduate degree from Amherst College in 1976 where he was the first student in the history of the college to graduate with honors in two subjects (Biology and English), and his MD from Harvard Medical School in 1980. Following an internship and residency in internal medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), he was a post-doctoral fellow in molecular genetics at Harvard Medical School, and then a clinical cardiology fellow at the MGH. He is board certified in internal medicine and in cardiology. In 1987 Dr. Marks joined the faculty of the Cardiology Division at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital. In 1990 he moved back to his hometown, New York, as an Assistant Professor of Molecular Biology and Medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine where he also served as an attending physician in cardiology. In 1995 he was named Fishberg Professor of Medicine at Mount Sinai. In 1997 he was recruited to Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons as the Founding Director of the Clyde and Helen Wu Center for Molecular Cardiology and Wu Professor of Medicine and Pharmacology. In 2003 Dr. Marks was appointed Chair and Professor of the Physiology and Cellular Biophysics Department at Columbia University. He was elected to the Council of the American Society of Clinical Investigation (1997-2000), and from 2002-2007 served as Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Clinical Investigation. His honors include: the Established Investigatorship Award from the American Heart Association (1993), elected to American Society of Clinical Investigation (ASCI) (1995), American Association of Physicians (AAP) (1999), the Distinguished Clinical Scientist Award of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation (2000), the Dean’s Distinguished Lecturer in Basic Science at Columbia (2004), the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies (2004), Basic Research Prize from the American Heart Association (2005), American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2005), the National Academy of Sciences (2005), Doctor of Science Honoris Causa from Amherst College (2009), ASCI Stanley J. Korsmeyer Award (2010), Pasarow Foundation Award for Cardiovascular Research (2011), the Ellison Medical Foundation Senior Scholar in Aging Award (2011), and the Glorney-Raisbeck Award from NY Academy of Medicine (2016). In 2015 Dr. Marks presented the Ulf von Euler lecture at the Karolinska Institute. Dr. Marks served on the NHLBI Advisory Council (2007-2011), the SAB of Centocor and of Novartis, the advisory committee of the Gladstone Institute for Cardiovascular Disease (UCSF) and the Harrington Discovery Institute (Case-Western Reserve University). Dr. Marks is chair of the SAB of ARMGO Pharma, Inc., a company he founded in 2006 to develop novel therapeutics for heart, muscle and CNS diseases, and is the inventor on eleven U.S. patents for these new treatments. In 2001 he founded the Summer Program for Under-represented Students (SPURS) at Columbia. SPURS provides mentored research training at Columbia University for under-represented and economically disadvantaged students primarily from the New York City public colleges and universities. In 2002 Dr. Marks founded IAFI (International Academic Friends of Israel) a not-for-profit organization devoted to promoting and supporting the free and open exchange of ideas and information in the international academic community that seeks to ensure that Israeli academics and scientists are included and accepted in global academic and scientific circles. Dr. Marks’ interest in fundamental biological processes and translating new understandings into therapies for patients first lead to his identification of the mechanism of action of inhibition of vascular smooth muscle proliferation and migration by the drug rapamycin. This discovery was the basis for the development of the first drug-eluting stent (coated with rapamycin) for treatment of coronary artery disease which substantially reduced the incidence of in-stent restenosis. He also showed that rapamycin reduced accelerated arteriopathy following cardiac transplantation. Over the past 25 years the major focus of his work has been elucidation of the role of intracellular calcium in regulating fundamental cellular processes including cardiac and skeletal muscle contraction, lymphocyte activation, cognitive function, and glucose metabolism. Dr. Marks defined the structure, function and regulation of the intracellular calcium release channels known as ryanodine rceptors and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors. In 2014, usinf cryo-EM, Dr. Marks reported the high resolution structure of the mammalian type 1 ryanodine receptor/calcium release channel (required for excitation-contraction coupling in skeletal muscle) which he had cloned and worked on since 1989. He discovered that « leaky » intracellular calcium release channels contribute to heart failure, fatal cardiac arrhythmias, impaired exercise capacity (e.g. in muscular dystrophy), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), Alzheimer’s Disease and diabetes. Dr. Marks discovered a new class of small molecules (Rycals), developed in his laboratory, that target leaky ryanodine receptor channels and effectively treat cardiac arrhythmias, heart failure, muscular dystrophy and prevent stress-induced cognitive dysfunction in preclinical studies. Rycals are being developed for the treatment of patients with heart failure, cardiac arrhythmias, and Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

Esther BarreiroCV

 
 

Esther BARREIRO

  Institution :
Research Institute of Hospital del Mar (IMIM), Pompeu Fabra University, Barcelona Biomedical Research Park (PRBB), Barcelona, Spain
  Institute :
Research Institute
  Position : Clinical researcher, Associate Professor  
 

Contact : ebarreiro@imim.es

Dr. Esther Barreiro is Associate Professor at Pompeu Fabra University (UPF) in Barcelona, where she teaches Human Pathophysiology and Scientific Communication to undergraduate and master students. In addition, Dr. Barreiro coordinates a Research Unit on Skeletal Muscle and Lung Cancer in Institute Hospital del Mar of Medical Investigation (IMIM) and is part of the medical staff of the Respiratory Medicine Department at the Hospital del Mar in Barcelona. This center is located in the Barcelona Biomedical Research Park (PRBB) premises. She is also a staff member of the Spanish Network of Excellence for Research in Respiratory Diseases (CIBERES). Dr. Barreiro completed her medical studies at the Universitat de Barcelona, where she graduated in 1989 and became specialist in Respiratory Medicine (1994). Subsequently, she obtained her Master of Science degree at McGill University (Montreal, Canada, 2001) and her Ph.D. degree at Universitat Pompeu Fabra (Barcelona, Spain, 2002), under the supervision of Prof. Sabah Hussain. Since early 2007 up until the present, Dr Barreiro has a tenure position as an independent researcher in the same institution. Her lines of research are linked to the study of molecular mechanism involved in cancer cachexia and muscle wasting in chronic conditions, and lung cancer development, using animal, cell, and human models. She has obtained more than 40 grants to conduct medical research including 2 funded by the European Commission, and has published more than 130 articles in peer-reviewed international journals and 15 book chapters. Finally, Dr. Barreiro is currently Editor-in-Chief of Archivos de Bronconeumología and Associate Editor of the Journal of Applied Physiology (since July 2011). She is also a member of the Editorial Board of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine since January 2012. She is also a full member of the American Thoracic, American Physiological, the European Respiratory and the Spanish Respiratory Societies.

Anne HOUDUSSECV

 
 

 

Anne HOUDUSSE

  Institution :
Institut Curie, FRANCE
  Institute :
UMR 144 CNRS – cell biology department
  Position : Research director CNRS
  Contact : anne.houdusse@curie.fr

Anne Houdusse is a CNRS research director in the Cell Biology department (UMR 144) at the Institut Curie, Paris, France. With undergraduate and graduate degrees from Ecole Normale Superieure and Pasteur Institute Paris, Anne Houdusse was trained as a structural biologist and a chemist, particularly X-ray crystallography. With a HFSPO fellowship, Anne studied myosin motors as a post-doctoral fellow at the Brandeis University where, with Carolyn Cohen and Andrew Szent Gyorgyi, she laid the foundation for her challenging work on structures of conventional myosins. In 1999, she was given an ATIP award and came back to Paris to establish her own independent laboratory. The focus of her group’s research at the Institut Curie has been the understanding of how motors produce force and how they are recruited and regulated in the cell. Studies of myosin V and myosin VI have established the essential elements of how all molecular motors produce directional force. This was in part funded via a Human Frontier grant in 2005-2008. This contribution has been recognized in 2009, with the FEBS/EMBO Women in Science Award. She was also awarded in 2013 with the CNRS Silver Medal and was elected member of EMBO.

Keywords : myosin, force production, unconventional myosin, molecular motors

Kathleen MORGANCV
kathleen Morgan
 
 

Kathleen MORGAN

  Institution :
Boston University, USA
  Institute :
Whitaker Institute
  Position : Professor
  Contact : kmorgan@bu.edu

Kathleen Morgan obtained her Ph.D at the University of Cincinnati in1976 by determining the mechanism of action of dantrolene sodium on the sarcoplasmic reticulum in striated muscle. She then moved to the Mayo Clinic in Rochester MN for a post-doctoral position, still working on excitation contraction coupling but in smooth muscle. In 1983 she became an Assistant Professor and in 1986 an Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School. From 1995-2004 she served as Director and CEO of the Boston Biomedical Research Institute. In 2006 she became Professor of Health Sciences at Boston University. She served as Chair of the Department from 2006-2015 and Dean ad interim of the college from 2014-2015. She teaches mostly on smooth muscle physiology and signal transduction. She is now investigating the molecular and biochemical mechanisms of cardiovascular disease, especially seeking therapeutic targets for the reversal of aging-induced aortic stiffness.

Keywords : Vascular smooth muscle, biochemical and biophysical mechanisms of contractility, aging

Bruno ALLARDCV

 
 

 

Bruno ALLARD

  Institution :
Université Lyon 1, France
  Institute :
Institut NeuroMyoGene – UMR Inserm/CNRS/Université Lyon 1
  Position : Professor
  Contact : bruno.allard@univ-lyon1.fr

Bruno Allard obtained his PhD in 1990 and is currently Professor of Physiology at the University Claude Bernard Lyon 1. He gives lectures on electrophysiology, muscle and neuron physiology and pharmacology. He recently studied calcium fluxes through the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane by monitoring calcium inside the SR in voltage-clamped mouse muscle fibers. He is currently characterizing calcium entry and electrical properties of mouse muscle fibers overexpressing pathological voltage-gated calcium channels.

Keywords : skeletal muscle fiber, excitation-contraction coupling, ion channels, intracellular calcium, voltage clamp

Robin CANDAUCV

Robin Candau
 

 

  Robin CANDAU
 
Institution :

Université de Montpellier, France
  Institute :
UMR 866 Muscle dynamic and metabolism
  Position : Full professor
  Contact : robin.candau@umontpellier.fr

Robin Candau obtained his Ph.D at the University of St Etienne (France) in 1992. In 2008, he got a position of full professor at the University of Montpellier. He teaches mostly on striated skeletal muscle physiology. He is now investigating the mechanisms of adaptation of the ATPase activity per myosin head.

Keywords : myosin ATPase, molecular mechanisms of muscle contraction, locomotion

Olivier CazorlaCV
 
 

 

Olivier CAZORLA

  Institution :
Université Montpellier, PHYMEDEXP
  Institute :
Inserm U1046, CNRS9214, team 02
  Position : CNRS Scientist
  Contact : Olivier.Cazorla@inserm.fr

Olivier Cazorla obtained his PhD in 1998 at the University of Tours (France) in Physiology and his work focused on the cellular mechanisms of Frank-Starling relationship in mammalian myocytes. His postdoctoral training was in Pr. Henk Granzier lab at Washington State University (USA) and he focused on the biophysical and biochemical characteristics of titin in mammalian hearts. Back in France at Montpellier with Dr Guy Vassort he investigated the modulation of cardiac contraction in normal and pathological conditions by modifying the contractile machinery. In 2003, Dr. Olivier Cazorla was recruited as a permanent researcher by center of national scientific research (CNRS) in the Cardiovascular Pathophysiology Laboratory of Montpellier University working from cellular physiology to in-vivo whole heart physiology.

Keywords : regional contraction, sarcomere, heart, myopathies

Fabio DI LISACV
 
 

 

Fabio DI LISA

  Institution :
University of Padova, Italy
  Institute :
Department of Biomedical Sciences
  Position : Professor of Biochemistry
  Contact : dilisa@bio.unipd.it

Fabio Di Lisa has provided significant contributions elucidating the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in cardiac diseases. He found that the mitochondrial membrane potential is maintained during anoxia using ATP produced by glycolysis, so that mitochondria changes from ATP producers into avid ATP utilizers. By developing methods to study the PTP in isolated cells and intact hearts Prof. Di Lisa characterized the occurrence of transient and prolonged openings demonstrating that the latter modality is involved in cell death. In addition, PTP opening was causally related to NAD depletion and loss of viability induced by reperfusion. Regarding oxidative alterations, Prof. Di Lisa demonstrated that the oxidation of myofibrillar proteins correlates linearly with contractile impairment. This relationship has been extended to muscular dystrophy. Concomitantly, he demonstrated the relevance of monoamine oxidases (MAO) as a relevant source of reactive species in cardiac and muscular diseases.

Keywords : Mitochondria, heart, calcium, oxidative stress

Philippe DIOLEZCV
 
 

Philippe DIOLEZ

  Institution :
Université de Bordeaux, France
  Institute :
INSERM U1045 – Centre de Recherche Cardio-Thoracique de Bordeaux & IHU-LIRYC – Institut de Rythmologie et Modélisation Cardiaque
  Position : Senior Researcher (CR1 CNRS)
  Contact : philippe.diolez@u-bordeaux.fr

After a PhD obtained at the University Pierre & Marie Curie (Paris) and invited scientist positions in University of California Davis (California, USA) and Cambridge University (UK), Philippe Diolez joined the Centre de Recherche Cardio-Thoracique de Bordeaux (INSERM U1045) in 2011, where he participated to the creation of LIRYC (Electrophysiology and Heart Modeling Institute). His current work is focused on the role of mitochondria in cardiac rhythm pathologies through calcium and especially oxygen radicals (ROS) signalisation.

Keywords : Mitochondria, heart, ROS, calcium, cardiac rhythm

Stephan E. LEHNARTCV
 
 

Stephan E. LEHNART

  Institution :
Georg-August University, University Medical Center Göttingen
  Institute :
Heart Research Center Göttingen; Clinic for Cardiology
  Position : University Professor
  Contact : slehnart@med.uni-goettingen.de

Stephan E. Lehnart has investigated mechanisms of calcium transport protein dysfunction in heart failure and other diseases. He contributed to the discovery of molecular mechanisms of intracellular calcium leak in the heart, brain, and skeletal muscle as well as novel molecular targeted therapies. Currently, he studies the role of nanoscopic membrane domains and tail-anchored proteins and how these are affected during disease. He develops new high resolution microscopy methods and quantitative tools for live cell nanoscopy and proteomic analysis strategies for local subcellular signaling domains.

Keywords : Ryanodine Receptor, EC Coupling, Tail-Anchored Proteins, Superresolution Microscopy

Jeremy FAUCONNIERCV
 
  Jeremy FAUCONNIER
 
Institution :

Université Montpellier, PHYMEDEXP
  Institute :
Inserm U1046, CNRS9214, team 02
  Position : CNRS Scientist
  Contact : Jeremy.fauconnier@inserm.fr

After his PhD, obtained in 2003 at the medical school of Montpellier University, Dr. Fauconnier Jérémy joined the Muscle Physiology group of Pr. H . Westerblad at the Karolinska Institute (Stockholm, Sweden). After two years of postdoctoral research, he was awarded by the national institute for medical and health research (INSERM) and obtained a 3 years research fellow. In 2007, Dr. Fauconnier Jérémy was recruited as a permanent researcher by center of national scientific research (CNRS) in the Cardiovascular Pathophysiology Laboratory of the medical school of Montpellier University. Dr. Fauconnier Jérémy main research topics focus on Calcium signalling, excitation-contraction coupling, mitochondria and cardiac and skeletal muscle metabolism. He is specialized in.

Keywords : Cellular electrophysiology, mitochondrial function, and calcium imaging

Kevin FLANIGANCV

 
 

 

Kevin FLANIGAN

  Institution :
Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, Ohio (USA)
  Institute :
Center for Gene Therapy
  Position : Principal Investigator; Professor of Pediatrics and Neurology
  Contact : kevin.flanigan@nationwidechildrens.org

Kevin FLANIGAN trained in Neurology and Neuromuscular Disease at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, followed by a laboratory fellowship in Human Molecular Biology and Genetics at the University of Utah, where he began his laboratory and his work on the diagnosis and treatment of Duchenne and other muscular dystrophies. Since 2009 he has been at the Center for Gene Therapy in Columbus, Ohio, where his lab works on molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis and amelioration in the dystrophinopathies, and on translational projects to bring new therapies to clinical trials for a variety of muscular dystrophies.

Keywords : dystrophinopathies, muscular dystrophies, gene therapy

Bijan GhalehCV
 
 

 

Bijan GHALEH

  Institution :
Université Paris Est Créteil
  Institute :
Unité Inserm U955, Equipe 03
  Position : Professor in pharmacology
  Contact : bijan.ghaleh@inserm.fr

Bijan Ghaleh obtained his Ph.D at the University of Paris Sud in 1995 by investigating the role of the endothelium in coronary vasomotion. He moved then at Southborough near Boston (Harvard Medical School) for a Post-doctoral position in Prof Steve Vatner’s lab and worked on myocardial infarction, left ventricular hypertrophy and heart failure. In 2000, he got a permanent position at the University of Paris Sud, as an Associate Professor and moved in 2003 to University of Paris Est Creteil where he was promoted as Professor in 2010. He teaches pharmacology and is currently directing a lab devoted to the physiopathology and pharmacology of myocardial infarction, cardiac arrest and heart failure.

Keywords : left ventricle, cardioprotection, contractile dysfunction

Henk GRANZIERCV
 
 

 

Henk GRANZIER

  Institution :
University of Arizona, USA
  Institute :
Cellular and Molecular Medicine
  Position : Professor
  Contact : granzier@email.arizona.edu

Henk Granzier obtained his PhD at the University of Washington in Seattle in Biomedical Engineering and his work focused on the molecular mechanism of muscle contraction. His postdoctoral training was in Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Texas at Austin and he focused on the functional roles of titin and nebulin in striated muscle. During his independent career first at Washington State University and presently at the University of Arizona he continued to work on titin and nebulin using an integrative approach that spans a wide range of levels from molecular biology, single molecule biophysics (atomic force microscopy), cellular physiology, signalling, muscle mechanics, to ex-vivo and in-vivo whole heart physiology.

Keywords : Titin, nebulin, heart, skeletal muscle, myopathies

Robert KellyCV
 
 

 

Robert KELLY

  Institution :
Aix-Marseille Université, Marseille, France
  Institute :
Developmental Biology Institute of Marseille, CNRS UMR 7288
  Position : Group leader
  Contact : Robert.Kelly@univ-amu.fr

Robert Kelly obtained his PhD at the University of Leicester, UK, and was subsequently a postdoctoral fellow at the Pasteur Institute, Paris, and visiting scientist at Columbia University, New York. Established in 2005, the Kelly group at the IBDM studies the genetic control of heart development, with focus on the mechanisms controlling addition of second heart field cardiac progenitor cells to the poles of the heart tube, a process regulated by the DiGeorge syndrome gene TBX1 and perturbed in common forms of congenital heart defects. The second heart field originates in mesoderm that also gives rise to a subset of craniofacial muscles and the group are investigating the mechanisms underlying divergent cardiac and skeletal myogenic fate in cardiopharyngeal mesoderm.

Keywords : Heart development, skeletal muscle development, Tbx1

Alain LacampagneCV
 
 

 

Alain LACAMPAGNE

  Institution :
Université Montpellier, PHYMEDEXP
  Institute :
Inserm U1046, CNRS9214, team 02
  Position : CNRS Senior Scientist
  Contact : alain.lacampagne@inserm.fr

Alain Lacampagne obtained his PhD in 1995 at the University of Tours (France) in Physiology and biophysics. His work was focused in cardiac electrophysiology and excitation-contraction (EC) coupling. He performed a first postdoctoral training in the laboratory of Martin Schneider (UMAB, Baltimore USA). He performed pioneer work on calcium sparks analysis in skeletal muscle. Back to France in 1998, he joined the lab of Dr Guy Vassort where he obtained in 1999 a permanent position at the « Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique » CNRS. His work is mainly focused on cardiac and skeletal muscles EC coupling in normal and pathological situation. Since 2007, he is leading an Inserm research team in Montpellier specialized in the analysis of calcium signaling and sarcomeric function in cardiac and skeletal muscles.

Keywords : excitation-contraction coupling, ryanodine receptors, muscle, heart, myopathies

H. Lee SweeneyCV
 
 

 

H. LEE SWEENEY

  Institution :
University of Florida, USA
  Institute :
Myology Institute, ARB
  Position : Professor
  Contact : Lsweeney@mail.med.upenn.edu

H. Lee Sweeney obtained his Ph.D at Harvard University in 1984, where he worked on contractile and metabolic properties of skeletal muscle. In 1989, he became an Assistant Professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, where he rose to the rank of Professor and Department Chair in 1998/1999. At Penn he established a laboratory with programs focused on myosin function and muscular dystrophy. He moved to the University of Florida in 2015 to establish a Myology Institute to focus on the development of therapeutics for the muscular dystrophies.

Keywords : muscular dystrophy, skeletal muscle, heart, myosin

Vincenzo LombardiCV
 
 

 

Vincenzo LOMBARDI

  Institution :
University of Florence (Italy)
  Institute :
Laboratory of Physiology, BIO
  Position : Professor of Physiology
  Contact : Vincenzo.lombardi@unifi.it

Vincenzo Lombardi started research in muscle physiology just after his Biology degree in 1970.The milestone in his scientific career has been the collaboration with Sir Andrew Huxley (University College London,1979-1981), for the development of high resolution devices for sarcomere-level mechanics in single fibres from frog skeletal muscle. Combination of fast mechanics and time resolved X-ray diffraction from synchrotron light has brought to the nanometer-microsecond description of the muscle myosin performance in situ and more recently of its regulation by mechanosensing in the thick filament.

Keywords : Sarcomere mechanics and structural dynamics

Stefan MateckiCV
 
 

 

Stefan MATECKI

  Institution :
Montpellier University, PHYMEDEXP (France)
  Institute :
UMR CNRS 9214 – Inserm U1046 http://u1046.edu.umontpellier.fr
  Position : Professor, Senior Scientist
  Contact : stephan.matecki@univ-montp1.fr

Stefan Matecki received his MD and PhD degree from Montpellier University, and completed specialty training in Infant Respiratory Physiology. After obtaining a Scientist Award from the Medical Research Council of Canada, he pursued post-doctoral research training at McGill University working in the areas of respiratory muscle biology and Duchene Muscular Dystrophy. Since joining the Montpellier University, he is currently at the head of a Pediatric functional exploration unit and serves as responsible of the respiratory group of the Physiological French society. He is also responsible of the Master Biology and health from Montpellier University. His current research interests include ventilation induced diaphragm dysfunction, the roles of mitochondrial dynamic in muscle atrophy and weakness, the pathogenesis of respiratory muscle failure in neuromuscular diseases and maximal exercise testing in infant with congenital heart disease.

Keywords : Diaphragm, mechanical ventilation, respiratory function, myopathies

Michel OVIZECV
 
 

 

Michel OVIZE

  Institution :
Université de LYON, France
  Institute :
Unité Inserm U1060 (CarMeN)
  Position : Professor
  Contact : michel.ovize@chu-lyon.fr

Michel Ovize received his MD degree at the Lyon School of Medicine in 1990 and his PhD in 1993. He is Professor of Cardiology and Physiology at Claude Bernard University and chief of the Non-Invasive Cardiology Department at the Louis Pradel Hospital, Lyon, France. He is also the leader of the « Cardioprotection » team in the CarMeN Inserm-1060 research unit, investigating the (mitochondrial) mechanisms of cell death following a prolonged ischemia-reperfusion injury. This translation research is also performed through the Clinical Investigation Center (CIC) of Lyon, the OPeRa IHU (University Hospital Institute) and the Ischemia Reperfusion Injury Syndromes (IRIS) FHU (Féderation Hospitalo-Universitaire) in Lyon.

Keywords : ischemia-reperfusion injury, postconditioning

Basil PETROFCV
 
 

 

Basil PETROF

  Institution :
McGill University Health Centre Montreal , (Canada)
  Institute :
Research Institute Professor, Senior Scientist, RI-MUHC, Glen site
  Position : Professor, Senior Scientist, RI-MUHC, Glen site
  Contact : basil.petrof@mcgill.ca

Basil Petrof received his MD degree from Laval University, and then completed specialty training in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at McGill University, and Sleep Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. After obtaining a Clinician-Scientist Award from the Medical Research Council of Canada, he pursued post-doctoral research training at the Center for Respiratory Neurobiology at the University of Pennsylvania, working in the areas of respiratory muscle biology and sleep medicine. Since joining the faculty at McGill, he received the FRSQ Chercheur National Award, was Vice-President of the Quebec Respiratory Health Network, and currently serves as Interim Director of the Meakins-Christie Laboratories and Director of the Program for Translational Research in Respiratory Diseases at the McGill University Health Centre Research Institute. His current research interests include respiratory muscle atrophy and weakness in the critically ill, the influence of inflammation on muscle injury and repair, the roles of mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagy in respiratory muscle pathology, and the pathogenesis of respiratory muscle failure in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and other neuromuscular diseases.

Keywords :

Martin PICARDCV
 
 

 

Martin PICARD

  Institution :
Columbia University, USA
  Institute :
Columbia University Medical Center, Division of Behavioral Medicine
  Position : Assistant Professor
  Contact : mp3484@columbia.edu

Martin Picard obtained his PhD at McGill University in 2012 where he developed experimental approaches to define functional and structural mitochondrial adaptations in skeletal muscle with aging and chronic disease. He then moved to Philadelphia for a postdoctoral fellowshipw at the Center for Mitochondrial and Epigenomic Medicine with Doug Wallace where he worked on mitochondria-mitochondria interactions, mitochondrial reprogramming of the nuclear transcriptome, and mitochondrial stress pathophysiology. In 2015, he moved to New York to open a laboratory at Columbia University where his group investigates the mechanisms by which acquired and inherited mitochondrial defects contribute to the damaging effects of metabolic and neuroendocrine stressors.

Keywords : mitochondria; signaling; mtDNA; electron microscopy

Vincent SAUZEAU CV
sauzeau
 
 

 

Vincent SAUZEAU

  Institution :
IRS-UN, institut du thorax, Nantes, France
  Institute :
Unité Inserm U1087
  Position : Researcher
  Contact : vincent.sauzeau@inserm.fr

Vincent Sauzeau obtained his Ph.D at the University of Nantes in 2003 by characterizing the roles of GTPase RhoA in the cardiovascular system. He then moved at the Cancer Institute of Salamanca (Spain) in order to continuing his scientific training on the Rho/Rac GTPase field. This stint was facilitated by the European Molecular Biology Organisation (EMBO) long term fellowship. His main work during this period has been the phenotypic characterization of knockout mice deficient in several members of the Vav family (Vav2 and Vav3), a group of signal transduction molecules that work as GDP/GTP exchange factors (GEFs) for Rho/Rac proteins. He joint the U915-thorax institute at the beginning of 2009 as a full-time researcher to identify in vivo the role in of Rac protein in smooth muscle cells.

Keywords : Rho/Rac proteins, smooth muscle cells, vascular and respiratory system

Shahragim TAJBAKHSHCV
 
 

 

Shahragim TAJBAKHSH

  Institution :
Institut Pasteur, Paris, France
Dept. : Developmental & Stem Cells Biology
  Institute :
Stem Cells & Development, CNRS UMR3738
  Position : Professor
  Contact : shahragim.tajbakhsh@pasteur.fr

Vincent Sauzeau obtained his Ph.D at the University of Nantes in 2003 by characterizing the roles of GTPase RhoA in the cardiovascular system. He then moved at the Cancer Institute of Salamanca (Spain) in order to continuing his scientific training on the Rho/Rac GTPase field. This stint was facilitated by the European Molecular Biology Organisation (EMBO) long term fellowship. His main work during this period has been the phenotypic characterization of knockout mice deficient in several members of the Vav family (Vav2 and Vav3), a group of signal transduction molecules that work as GDP/GTP exchange factors (GEFs) for Rho/Rac proteins. He joint the U915-thorax institute at the beginning of 2009 as a full-time researcher to identify in vivo the role in of Rac protein in smooth muscle cells.

Keywords : Rho/Rac proteins, smooth muscle cells, vascular and respiratory system

Adams VOLKERCV
volker
 
 

 

Adams VOLKER

  Institution :

University Leipzig – Heart Center, Germany

  Institute : Cardiology
  Position : Head of the Research Laboratory
  Contact : adav@medizin.uni-leipzig.de

Volker Adams obtained his PhD at the University of Konstanz in Biology and his work focused on isolation and characterization of mitochondrial contact sites in different organs. His postdoctoral training was in molecular genetics at the Institute of Molecular Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston Texas, USA. During this time he focused on cloning and molecular characterization of the human glycerol-kinase gene and the characterization of the hexokinase binding to the mitochondrial outer membrane – structure function analysis. After moving to Leipzig, and taking over the position as head of the research laboratory at the Heart Center Leipzig his main research interest during the last 20 years is to understand the molecular changes in the skeletal muscle in patients with heart failure and the impact of exercise training.

Keywords : Skeletal muscle, diaphragm, heart failure, proteasome system

Håkan WESTERBLADCV
 
 

 

Håkan WESTERBLAD

  Institution :
Karolinska Institutet
  Institute :
Physiology & Pharmacology
  Position : Professor
  Contact : hakan.westerblad@ki.se

Håkan Westerblad obtained his PhD at the Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, in 1989 by conducting pioneering studies on mechanisms of skeletal muscle fatigue. He then continued these studies as a post-doc in the laboratory of Prof David G Allen at Sydney University, Australia. In 2003, he got a permanent position as Professor at Karolinska Institutet. His current research focuses on the interplay between Ca2+, reactive oxygen/nitrogen species, and mitochondria in association with skeletal muscle fatigue, training and pathologies with muscle weakness.

Keywords : Skeletal muscle fatigue, Ca2+, reactive oxygen/nitrogen species, mitochondria

Peter ZammitCV
 
 

 

Peter ZAMMIT

  Institution :
King’s College London
  Institute :
Randall Division of Cell and Molecular Biophysics
  Position : Professor of Cell Biology
  Contact : peter.zammit@kcl.ac.uk

Peter Zammit obtained his PhD from King’s College London, before undertaking post-docs with Professor Margaret Buckingham at the Pasteur Institute in Paris and then Professor Terence Partridge at Imperial College London. He started his group at King’s College London in 2005. Skeletal muscle is an archetypal adult stem cell model, in which maintenance, growth and repair of functionally specialised post-mitotic cells is achieved by recruitment of undifferentiated precursors. For the past 18 years, his core research has been directed at understanding how muscle stem cells are regulated in healthy, aged and diseased skeletal muscle. The functional unit of skeletal muscle is the myofibre: a giant syncytial cell maintained by hundreds of post-mitotic myonuclei. The routine needs for myonuclear homeostasis, together with the more sporadic demands for hypertrophy and repair, are performed by muscle satellite cells. These resident stem cells are normally mitotically quiescent in mature muscle, and so must first be activated to undergo extensive proliferation to generate myoblasts that eventually differentiate to provide new myonuclei. The main themes of the group at King’s College London currently include investigating the transcriptional and signaling control of satellite cell activation and cell fate choice, examining pathomechanisms and potential therapies for Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, Fascioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy and rhabdomyosarcoma, and testing biomaterials for their ability to support myogenesis.

Keywords : Satellite cells, muscle stem cells, skeletal muscle, muscular dystrophy